Shop Door Fix

 

The front entranceway to the shop had suffered some water damage.

There was some exterior damage and that had worked its way inside and caused some floor tile damage.

Water Issues

Exterior Repairs

Interior Repairs

Awning Assembly and Installation

 


Water Issues

A major cause of the water damage had been splash up off of the entry platform. I had lowered the deck some time ago to try and reduce the splash up...but the doorway really takes a beating during rain storms and it is in in full sun as well...
 

So an awning was a possible solution to this issue...ordered one off the internet...nuimage.com.

 

Exterior upper issue: There was some soffit damage above the door that had occured when a limb had fallen and caused some problems with the gutter.

This soffit needed to be replaced so that all would be in prime shape for the installation of the awning

Exterior Repairs

 
The 8 inch wide strip of 1/4 inch plywood run x 8 feet was nailed to a great support system...originally there had been a soffit vent in this run but I did not replace the vent because there will be some splash up at the top of the awning.
Lower left door frame...wood was rotted at the bottom, right where there was a finger joint..

Chiseled out squared at top up to the 7+ inch mark...

used Matsumura bench chisel as the beater...
Nikishi kinari as the paring chisel...
Had to use a metal cutting blade to remove some old screws.
Made a replacement blank out of treated 1 x 4 lumber...measured the angle on the opposite door and set in on the blank...
cut that angle with a crosscut carcase saw...
chiseled it out
dry fit it...chamfered the top to make it easy to pound in...needed it to be very tight because the lower angle cut edge has to press down on the aluminum threshold to hold it firmly at the proper angle.
...dry fit at the bottom.
Prep of old wood...Bondo wood rot...
...6 coats brushed on...
...let it dry two hours...then mixed Bondo wood filler...
...mixed 3 inch blob with a 3 inch strip of hardener...
The mix was drying way fast due to hot temperature...
I spread in onto the area, it dried incredibly quickly.
...sanded.
 
The blank was primed on the backside, painted, and then glued to door frame...later screwed through and into the frame, planed, chiseled, sanded, preped for primer...
Trim installed, primed, painted....along with a piece of cove to deal with some offset issues.

On the right side of the door, the wall sheathing panel joint was poor...at the build it not lined correctly with the stud...

 
On the left there were some joint issues that had occurred when I retro-installed the window. I renailed to the inside studs and secured the joint on the outside...caulked and spackled, primed...
Front after a coat of paint...
 

Interior Repairs

...water damage had occured on the inside wall...
 
   
   

Awning Assembly

Dry fit performed in shop...Cindy and I organized and inventoried all of the parts...color coordinated them...image was made from the underside of the right end. The aluminum slats interlock edge to edge...

The center supports, the Canapy Rafters, screw into the top trim and the gutter...the entire support runs under the Slat Section...image is from the right end of the awning on the underside.
The two end supports, the Edge Rafters (left and right) have a groove that the Slat Sections fit in. The rafter is secured with screws at the Top Trim and the Gutter...
View from the left end end-underside of the Gutter which connects to all four Rafters...
Assembly: the Edge Rafter slid onto the Slat Section and lined up at the Top Trim and the Front Gutter...secured with 1/4 inch metal tapping screws.

The two Canopy Rafters were secured to the Top Trim and the Front Gutter.

These Rafters are entirely under the Slat Panel Canopy.

The Canopy Rafters and the Slat Panels were "clipped together" with Interlock Clips.
The completed canopy...
The Support Arms were secured to the Gutter...
...and they will be suspended in place until the install.
The Sidewing was screwed into the Edge Rafter (on the outside of the Suport Arm).
The completed awning...ready for install.
We drilled a hole near the end of the Mounting Bar...and we knew that the stud at 80 inches was not reachable...so we put in a scab.
We then installed the Mounting Bar about 6 inches lower than the soffitt... we did not have to worry about the how low the awning was because the shop door opens inward.
James working on the end fo the awning...the Top Trim did not sit just right in the Mounting Bar...the installation screw was not getting the job done, so we used a slightly longer and thicker screw and got happy enough.
Side view...
...the Sidewing and the Support Arm.

Front view...really throws some shade on that door.

I hope it does as good a job with the rain.

 

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