Breadboard Table Top

with

Manual Lift

 

The manual table lift kit was ordered from Lee Valley... a breadboarded slab of mahogany will be affixed to the lift kit.

 

 

Design

Wood Selection, Milling Wood

Assembly

Sanding, Finish Application

Final Product

 

Design

The lift kit is model #00S80.37.

 

The breadboarded top will have a slab of five six inch wide boards...for a total of 30 inches wide.

The exposed length of the slab will be 50 inches with a total length of 60 inches with the two breadboard ends added.

The breadboard ends will be five inches wide by 30 1/8 inches long.

They will have a 7/8 inch deep by 1/4 inch wide mortise ...stopped one inch from the ends.

The haunch will fit into this mortise...there will also be three deeper sockets...1 5/8 inch...to accept the three tenons.

The boards in the slab will have 50 inches of exposure plus each end will have three 1 1/2 inch long by 1/4 inch thick tenons.

The rest of the boards will have a 3/4 inch long haunch.

The two outer boards will have 1 inch sawn shoulders.

My preliminary Sketchup is utilizing a downloaded base unit that is not of the exact type that we will us...but it gives a general idea.

Wood Selection, Milling

 

 

I purchased some 4/4 rough mahogany stock from Larry at Heartwood in Star, MS.

Boards were ~6 inches wide and ~8 1/2 feet long.

 

First thing I did was to calculate the cuts on all of the rough stoock and chopped the boards down to more easily worked sizes.

Cindy and I did one surface face and edge on the jointer so that I would select the blanks...these boards are all furniture manunfactor's seconds...so it is somewhat rough and varied stock.
The selected blanks were planed to 3/4 inch.
Then final placements were determined...grain run, color issues, etc.
Squared and cut to length.
Final layout with marriage markings...
The many steps of the glue up were planned out...
Edges received glue..
Many clamps and cauls...
Out of the clamps...lineup of many devices ...6 bow cauls, six Besseys, 2 Dubuques, two Irwin and two F type...
Preliminary cleanup done...
Ready to put the tenons on the end...made a jig that will become a fence to allow the tenons to be cut with a router...it fits over the workpiece and allows the fence to be set on both the top surface and the bottom surface.
...at the bandsaw, cut out some wedges that will be used to lock the fence in place...
...a wedge in place.
Using a spacer piece, flat and then on edge, enabled two router runs to make about 1 inch of the tenon...the final run, against the jig fence, provided the tenon shoulder.
The tenon...one side done...measured to make the 1/4 inch tenon fat...then flip the tabletop and do the same routing on the bottom side.
Tenons were worked to a happy state with the LV skew rabbet plane and sanding...
Mortises were made with 1/4 inch router bits...CTD with through grooves was used to get spacing right.
The bread board ends had to be dropped down onto the bit and picked up at the appropriate location since these are stopped grooves.

The african mahogany was tough and we broke off both two-flute bits we tried...one was a 1/4 shaft, the other a 1/2 inch shaft...

picked up a new carbide up cut spiral...we lessened the increments of raising the bit to 1/8 per pass...this drastically reduced the stress as to cutting depth.

Bit quality is a step up also.

Finished creating stopped mortises 1/4 x 7/8 inch deep...
Then laid out the deep mortise locations...
For cutting thes tenons...cope, LN xcut, and Bad Axe for the rips...
Ripped, cross cut, and coped with the table slab on saw benches...
A finished tenon...copes in the wonky wood gave ugly edges...they wll disappear forever in the mortise...
Laying out for the location of the mortise pockets.
The deep pockets will be 1 1/2 inches...the mortise chisel was lined up to work straight into the existing groove and then go to depth.

Holes for the 3/8 inch dowels were drilled...about 3/4 inch out from the shoulder.

About time to remove the piece for final prep...

The holes on the outside tenons were elongated with rat tail rasp...toward the outside a little bit and something more toward the inside...
Finished end unit...ready to be pegged.
Oak dowels were put in place...the center dowel was glued all the way...the outer pegs (see left dowel) only got glue on the top 1/3...
Dowels flush cut...
The breadboard ends were deliberately a little fat and they would need to be leveled out...started with 60x on Rotex 150mm.
Progressed 60x, 100x, 220x, to 400x...
The outer edges, on the top and bottom, were chamfered..
And then hand sanded 150x to 220x...
A rubbed on coat of amber 2 lb. shellac...
   
   

Up Down Unit

Assembly and Top Installation

Regarding the "Made in China" lift kit...I was very pleased that the metal supports were reasonably stout...but the hardware and milling were barely acceptable and of course, the instructions were truly horrid.

There were no instructions when it came to putting together the most difficult sub-assembly.

The instructions basically said "Install the handle"...not mentioning the dozen important insertions, adjustments, and tweaks that were required to make the right leg lift assembly work...

...and then the lift function from the right leg had to be mirrored in the left leg...
The predrilled holes in the base did not line up in a way that would be acceptable for wood movement...so the four leg hole locations were elongated in towards the centerline...used a couple of rat tail files...
...the elongated hole.
Sanding, Finish Application
Surface prep was difficult...the wood is very active and figured...lots of directional changes...used the 55°high angle frog on the LN #4 smoother...
...then LN 212 small scraper plane...
...then cards......then sanding...Rotex x to x  
   
 
The Final Product
 

 

 

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